Crown of Air

This poem should be read as the poetic companion piece to my essay Covid-19: Agent of Change, which I posted last week. I haven't wrote a new poem for ages. I expect on finishing my MA I will write poetry enthusiastically, I still think in it at least, I just don't stop, as I inveterately …

Sarah Law (Chapbook Confessions #2)

Another Chapbook Confession this week, this time by poet Sarah Law. Law writes on her collection Ink’s Wish, about a Medieval visionary called Margery Kempe. Her poems from the collection, are rich in details, zooming in on incidents from Kempe’s biography, a thorough character study of a woman, creating a connection between the contemporary conscience & the Medieval. Well worth a look-see.

I’d also like to remind you poets with collections & chapbooks etc, that we are always open for submissions in all our categories, but we’d especially like to read about your Confessions. I was hoping poets would be jumping at the opportunity to talk about their work, almost completely free of restraint, free to roam the experience & talk about everything or anything about it, as well as the chance to see some of the poems published. What you playing at! Get busy. Where else is this opportunity available? As far as I know, only at Underfoot. Get your arses in gear.

Daniel

Underfoot Poetry

Chapbook Confessions is a series in which poets discuss, at length, the writing of their most recent collection of poems, in whatever way they desire. For more information on the series, go here.

Below, Sarah Law writes on her 2014 collection Ink’s Wish.

Sarah Law lives in London, UK, and is a tutor for the Open University and elsewhere. She has published five collections of poetry, the latest of which is Ink’s Wish. Recent and forthcoming work in Ink, Sweat & Tears; Ekphrastic Review; Eunoia Review; Amaryllis; The Windhover, Saint Katherine Review; Where is the River and elsewhere.


21566728These poems are from my collection Ink’s Wish which was originally published by Gatehouse Press and was shortlisted (one of four collections in the poetry category) in 2014 for the East Anglian Book Awards of that year. The small (100 only!) print run from Gatehouse soon sold out and I…

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Renovation-aesthetic

(Remember, what follows is opinion, as always in these essays, it is not an incontestable truth.) Renovating-aesthetic The following passage is from Robert Browning’s Red Cotton Night Cap Country or Turf & Towers: Have you, the travelled lady, found yourself Inside a ruin, fane or bath or cirque, Renowned in story, dear through youthful dream? …

A funeral rite was once an art…

This is not a Christmas poem (i'll pretend that isn't happening), neither is it exclusively about Shelley, despite the Louis Edouard Fournier painting suggesting otherwise. i suppose, if the man being cremated is a poet, then the funeral rite, through contagious magic, becomes a work of art. ∞ A funeral rite was once an art but …

Thinking out loud the creature’s destructive capacities in decorative maps

∞ On that 16th C. Map of the World back home, hanging decoratively on the wall, i can’t shake the presence of the creature, moving like a pulse rate, monitored on life support machinery, snaking through dark acrylic waters, a cautious galleon nearby, sailors praying for shrouding mist, superstitious mist, drunk on scurvy & weak …

From unreleased footage of a BBC documentary on Wallace Stevens

Before i risk misleading you, this is a fictional poem from a short collection of poems i wrote called The Wallace Variations, which take Wallace Stevens' life & work as a theme to be used fictionally, philosophically, stylistically & other such avenues. Another poem called Return to Vesuvius is also from this unpublished, short collection. Kreymbourg was Stevens' editor …