dementia I

When my grandma died from COVID in December, she’d also spent many years descending into dementia. After listening to a 6 hour long ambient album called Everywhere at the end time by a musician from Manchester called The Caretaker, which attempts to sonically represent the slow declension into dementia, I decided to write a series…

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Hallucinating insuperable signifiers—part II

Reorienting ‘idle-talk’ Death is repulsion for the living. This is the case even when the insuperability of death is accepted as natural, therefore ineluctable, insuperable. Ironically, to have being we must be in something and yet the being-in of death includes in– with reference to the not. Acceptance of inevitabilities does not provide us with…

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Onanism

A poem from Yoon Yong. I had a debate in the pub the other week about onanism. I have a theory that the violence of men, may have its root in onanism: in one onanistic act, a man lays waste on a rag, to an entire population. Dylan Thomas was concerned with this. So is…

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Appearances

There will be a Yoon Yong poem today & tomorrow. I promise. Appearances   …My cheekbones are fine | my chin if a little chiseled. I don’t agree with where my hair parts   the same as my father’s | not symmetrical like my mother. Glad I got mother’s long legs   but my father’s…

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Nostalgia

Yoon Yong. Nostalgia   …The morning news buzzing in the background… —Her father stopped reading the newspaper   when his sight grew dim. She liked to see him read: she felt in good hands |   that her father could guide her. She tried to replicate the paper’s cackle   with other materials—my own onomatopoeia…

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The dilemma of loving a child

Yoon Yong is edging closer to the end now. Just so you know, hagwons, in Korea, are privately run academies, which children attend as well as school. They are largely English academies, however there are math, science & art hagwons too. They fill a void school’s cannot fill due to the Korean school system not…

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Idleness, a dog’s lot

The Rock (not the muscle-headed Hollywood Rock who doesn’t perform his own stunts but looks hard like he does) in T.S. Eliot’s play explains, The lot of man is ceaseless labour,Or ceaseless idleness, which is still harder,Or irregular labour, which is not pleasant. Now assuming idle here isn’t a play on idol—which, with a lit-crit…

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