Busan 3

i promise this is the last batch, don’t want anyone climbing the walls or thinking i’m a broing Uncle Herb type with his projector slides from trip circa ’93.

i’ve had fun manipulating the truth though.

19 Comments Add yours

  1. angela1313 says:

    I enjoyed them. I only got to Pusan once but my former roomate is from there. Seeing the changes in Korea always amazes me. people who have only seen the “new” Korea have no idea how far they’ve bome. Besides, you’re a good photograpger, I like your sense of composition.

    1. Thanks Angela. Photography is very new to me & i am continually finding my feet, so your praise is really appreciated.
      Korea has come leaps & bounds, it is amazing really. It took me sometime to appreciate the development, but when i see Europe stuck in a past it cannot progress beyond, it makes me realize that perhaps moving on is necessary, maybe not.
      i was actually overwhelmed by an apartment block in Busan, which is a first for me, the size astounded me, i just couldn’t get over how big it is. i couldn’t even photograph it as it just didn’t do justice to the enormity of it.
      It is only because of learning to photograph my environment that i have come to consider the value of modern architecture, else i’d be stuck in that un-moving past still.

  2. I took a picture almost exactly like “The Empty Sweatshop” except that it was rows of accordions in a shop in Seoul. There is something about unused/yet to be used machinery that makes for interesting photojournalism…

    1. That was an All Saints shop of all places. The aesthetic of it was just too enticing.

      1. Thus the dramatic backlighting. I wonder if it was/is ironic, considering how many manufacturers use sweatshop/child labor to sew their clothes or AllSaints’ own failure to addressed forced labour (cotton sourcing)…

      2. O the irony is palpable, its no mistake that title nor the choice to photograph this display in the first place. i am doing my utmost to take photos with some purpose beyond tourist shots. Thus the need for manipulation & the titles.

      3. Oh All Saints…filled with few actual saints apparently…

      4. Rock n roll clobber for K pop & techno kids; whatever happened to my rock & roll.

  3. What happened to my/our rock n’ roll is what always happens to “our” stuff…it becomes more ours (generation) as the next gets “theirs”. The American classical academy was looking for their own Bach in the early 20th century and he showed up… in the form of Louis Armstrong. So whatever will keep the true spirit of rock and roll alive…will be in a form that any/ever generation will not be expecting.

    No one thought their could be another Black Sabbath (capture their spirit) but Soundgarden did. No one thought there could be another Pink Floyd but RadioHead found a way. No one thought hip hop could be an art until Public Enemy released “It Takes A Nation of Millions..” and showed the world sampling could be amazing sound sculpture.YES, RUSH, and Genesis showed that rock could be as well sculpted/composed as classical music, and so on. There are now so many hybrids and eclectic ways of making music, we may not ever have another major moment in music like the arrival of the Beatles or Elvis, etc, but at least we have the greatest feast ever laid before us in terms of choice.

    And now, the old founders of what became “our” modern music just sound that much more profound considering what they spawned.

    1. i totally agree. There is some incredible music about & much of it is one Youtube or Soundcloud for nothing, because folks are resourceful with equipment & whether they get a dime will make music & put it out. i found some astounding music this way. Jerry Paper is one such i love & Glue Trip, Mac Demarco, Yellow Days, the list goes on & on.

  4. I simply love those beautiful and aesthetic pictures!!

    1. As i am a perfect beginner in photography, your words of praise are really encouraging, thank you very much.

  5. Pablo Cuzco says:

    I love the neighborhood overlook. On the dramas, they’re often living in a rooftop apartment. At night the vistas range (I think with help from postproduction) from a relaxing blue to a warm amber. And the hills. I love the stepped architecture of even the most humble areas.

    1. Cheers Pablo. Busan is very different to other parts of Korea, because it came away from the War unscathed. So even though there are some colossus here in the form of apartments, the old rough hewn neighbourhoods live on.

  6. robert okaji says:

    Your skills in photography have come a long way, Daniel. These are stunning. Great composition.

    1. Cheers Bob. i found myself taking the photos with post production in mind this time round. Setting the camera in preparation & making the shots count. The street shots with people were of course reactions i was hoping would work out but the architecture shots were considered.

      1. robert okaji says:

        Your eye has always been good, but these are spectacular. Deliberate. Well done. I am envious.

      2. Really pleased they have made such an impression it spurs me on to do even better.

      3. robert okaji says:

        They have, Daniel. The poet’s eye. The mind of winter, and all that. 👍

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