day out with wife & Len(s)

went for a little outing with the wife today & she actually agreed to be photographed, which she usually forbids. i think she is encouraging me with this photo lark as i have been doing it for the advertising company we hire & we have been getting more reservations because of my efforts, which is cosmic for me as i get a puppet to practice on & she’s photogenic, so job’s a gud’n.
went to a gallery by a deceased sculpture & photographer Kim Yeong Gab & his work is astonishing, his sculptures say a lot about him, he died of Lou Gehrig’s disease & they seem to be a manifestation of how the disease made his body feel. i am working on more work about him, a longish poem, so i won’t labour the subject of him here.

25 thoughts on “day out with wife & Len(s)

    1. thank you, she’s 40 next year.
      the figurines are fascinating & people don’t seem to make the connection to his illness, when i tell them my theory the light goes on & they look at them differently. Koreans are very open to ideas, but never catch them without outside influence.
      Jeju is a beautiful place & very inspiring to an outsider & even Koreans sensitive enough to its constantly altering face.

      1. I think art is left for artists to think about. I may be incorrect but i feel the average Korean just enjoys art they don’t really think about it. Either it is or isn’t beautiful that is it.

      2. i make it sound like they are ignorant, it is just not in the their interest to talk about art. i have been with Koreans & they’ll tour a gallery but they don’t respond powerfully, if you get my drift. a western with no knowledge of art due to perhaps a sense that everyone should have something to say will have an opinion, which can sometimes be more annoying than just nodding nice. i am generalizing based on my experiences. i have of course met Korean artists with plenty to say & very sensitive, but even they tell me they are somewhat of a minority.

      3. Yes, that shifts priorities. I have no idea about south korean history didn’t know of that aspect. It really is a position of privelage to be free enough to enjoy consuming or creating art, although art is created in suffering too, so maybe I’ve just contradicted myself.

      4. The first half of the 20th century was spent under the rule of the Japanese Empire who pretty much attempted to cleanse the culture of its heritage, even taking their trees, pine & cherry blossom, & planting them with acacia, which has a short life. they changed dates & of course enforced the Japanese language, the worst of it was that they killed them, lots of them, for petty reasons. then of course after they were free of this there was the Korean war 50′ to 53′ during which something close to 2.5 – 3.0 million Koreans died. after this there was the rule of a number of military dictator who stamped out expression for business & bureaucracy, anything to rebuild the country. Park Chung-hee, being the worst, who was the father of the current president, a total bastard as far as i understand, a bully, tyrant, torturer. a famous poet Kim Chi-ha is famous for writing in protest of that govt. a stunning poet who was given the death sentence, but saved by the international community of poets who petitioned his freedom.
        sorry if any of this is incorrect, i am writing from memory. i think i got most of it right.

      5. Korea is quite interesting in that due to the tragedies of what is really a rather recent history their antiquity has sort of vanished & what is in fact a 5 1/2 thousand year old civilization are taking baby steps into the cultural foray of the modern world & if they can develop with the same diligence they managed to straighten & improve their economy (Bloomberg recently rated Korean world’s No1 most innovative economy) then we may see some interesting art from them.

      6. Yeah, Samsung, Kia not sure what else but they are pretty big players. The are will come no doubt, particularly with easy access to alternate views/perspectives nowadays.

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